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POWERFACTOR

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WHAT IS POWER FACTOR?

The power factor is defined as the ratio of real power to apparent power. As power is transferred along a transmission line, it does not consist purely of real power that can do work once transferred to the load, but rather consists of a combination of real and reactive power, called apparent power. The power factor describes the amount of real power transmitted along a transmission line relative to the total apparent power flowing in the line.

In an electric power system, a load with a low power factor draws more current than a load with a high power factor for the same amount of useful power transferred. The higher currents increase the energy lost in the distribution system, and require larger wires and other equipment. Because of the costs of larger equipment and wasted energy, electrical utilities will usually charge a higher cost to industrial or commercial customers where there is a low power factor.


REAL POWER:

Alternative words used for Real Power (Actual Power, True Power, Watt-full Power, Useful Power, Real Power, and Active Power) In a DC Circuit, power supply to the DC load is simply the product of Voltage across the load and Current flowing through it i.e., P = V I. because in DC Circuits, there is no concept of phase angle between current and voltage. In other words, there is no Power factor in DC Circuits. But the situation is Sinusoidal or AC Circuits is more complex because of phase difference between Current and Voltage. Therefore average value of power (Real Power) is P = VI Cosθ is in fact supplied to the load. In AC circuits, When circuit is pure resistive, then the same formula used for power as used in DC as P = V I.


REACTIVE POWER:

Also known as (Use-less Power, Watt less Power) The powers that continuously bounce back and forth between source and load is known as reactive Power (Q) Power merely absorbed and returned in load due to its reactive properties is referred to as reactive power The unit of Active or Real power is Watt where 1W = 1V x 1 A. Reactive power represent that the energy is first stored and then released in the form of magnetic field or electrostatic field in case of inductor and capacitor respectively. Reactive power is given by Q = V I Sinθ which can be positive (+ve) for inductive, negative (-Ve) for capacitive load. The unit of reactive power is Volt-Ampere reactive. I.e. VAR where 1 VAR = 1V x 1A.

In more simple words, in Inductor or Capacitor, how much magnetic or electric field made by 1A x 1V is called the unit of reactive power.

 

APPARENT POWER:

The product of voltage and current if and only if the phase angle differences between current and voltage are ignored.

Total power in an AC circuit, both dissipated and absorbed/returned is referred to asapparent power The combination of reactive power and true power is called apparent power In an AC circuit, the product of the r.m.s voltage and the r.m.s current is called apparent power. It is the product of Voltage and Current without phase angle

The unit of Apparent power (S) VA i.e. 1VA = 1V x 1A. When the circuit is pure resistive, then apparent power is equal to real or true power, but in inductive or capacitive circuit, (when Reactances exist) then apparent power is greater than real or true power.

Lagging and Leading Power Factors:

In addition, there is also a difference between a lagging and leading power factor. A lagging power factor signifies that the load is inductive, as the load will “consume” reactive power, and therefore the reactive component Q is positive as reactive power travels through the circuit and is “consumed” by the inductive load. A leading power factor signifies that the load is capacitive, as the load “supplies” reactive power, and therefore the reactive component Q is negative as reactive power is being supplied to the circuit.


Since the units are consistent, the power factor is by definition a dimensionless number between −1 and 1. When power factor is equal to 0, the energy flow is entirely reactive and stored energy in the load returns to the source on each cycle. When the power factor is 1, all the energy supplied by the source is consumed by the load. Power factors are usually stated as "leading" or "lagging" to show the sign of the phase angle. Capacitive loads are leading (current leads voltage), and inductive loads are lagging (current lags voltage).

If a purely resistive load is connected to a power supply, current and voltage will change polarity in step, the power factor will be unity (1), and the electrical energy flows in a single direction across the network in each cycle. Inductive loads such as transformers and motors (any type of wound coil) consume reactive power with current waveform lagging the voltage. Capacitive loads such as capacitor banks or buried cable generate reactive power with current phase leading the voltage. Both types of loads will absorb energy during part of the AC cycle, which is stored in the device's magnetic or electric field, only to return this energy back to the source during the rest of the cycle.

For example, to get 1 kW of real power, if the power factor is unity, 1 kVA of apparent power needs to be transferred (1 kW ÷ 1 = 1 kVA). At low values of power factor, more apparent power needs to be transferred to get the same real power. To get 1 kW of real power at 0.2 power factor, 5 kVA of apparent power needs to be transferred (1 kW ÷ 0.2 = 5 kVA). This apparent power must be produced and transmitted to the load in the conventional fashion, and is subject to the usual distributed losses in the production and transmission processes.

POWER FACTOR IN LINEAR CIRCUITS:

In a purely resistive AC circuit, voltage and current wave forms are in step (or in phase), changing polarity at the same instant in each cycle. All the power entering the load is consumed (or dissipated).

Where reactive loads are present, such as with capacitors or inductors, energy storage in the loads results in a phase difference between the current and voltage wave forms. During each cycle of the AC voltage, extra energy, in addition to any energy consumed in the load, is temporarily stored in the load in electric or magnetic fields, and then returned to the power grid a fraction of the period later.

Because HVAC distribution systems are essentially quasi-linear circuit systems subject to continuous daily variation, there is a continuous "ebb and flow" of nonproductive power. Non productive power increases the current in the line, potentially to the point of failure.

Thus, a circuit with a low power factor will use higher currents to transfer a given quantity of real power than a circuit with a high power factor. A linear load does not change the shape of the waveform of the current, but may change the relative timing (phase) between voltage and current.


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